JMIR Medical Informatics

Editor-in-Chief:

Christian Lovis, MD, MPH, FACMI, Division of Medical Information Sciences, University Hospitals of Geneva (HUG), University of Geneva (UNIGE), Switzerland


Impact Factor 2.58

JMIR Medical Informatics (JMI, ISSN 2291-9694; Impact Factor: 2.58) (Editor-in-chief: Christian Lovis MD MPH FACMI) is a PubMed/SCIE-indexed journal that focuses on clinical informatics, big data in health and health care, decision support for health professionals, electronic health records, ehealth infrastructures and implementation. In June 2020, JMI was given an impact factor of 2.58.

Published by JMIR Publications, JMIR Medical Informatics has a focus on applied, translational research, with a broad readership including clinicians, CIOs, engineers, industry and health informatics professionals.

JMIR Medical Informatics adheres to rigorous quality standards, involving a rapid and thorough peer-review process, professional copyediting, professional production of PDF, XHTML, and XML proofs (ready for deposit in PubMed Central/PubMed).

Recent Articles

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Theme Issue 2020-2021: Medical Informatics and COVID-19

The COVID-19 pandemic has exacerbated the challenges of meaningful health care digitization. The need for rapid yet validated decision-making requires robust data infrastructure. Organizations with a focus on learning health care (LHC) systems tend to adapt better to rapidly evolving data needs. Few studies have demonstrated a successful implementation of data digitization principles in an LHC context across health care systems during the COVID-19 pandemic.

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Theme Issue 2020-2021: Medical Informatics and COVID-19

Scientists are developing new computational methods and prediction models to better clinically understand COVID-19 prevalence, treatment efficacy, and patient outcomes. These efforts could be improved by leveraging documented COVID-19–related symptoms, findings, and disorders from clinical text sources in an electronic health record. Word embeddings can identify terms related to these clinical concepts from both the biomedical and nonbiomedical domains, and are being shared with the open-source community at large. However, it’s unclear how useful openly available word embeddings are for developing lexicons for COVID-19–related concepts.

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Machine Learning

Postoperative length of stay is a key indicator in the management of medical resources and an indirect predictor of the incidence of surgical complications and the degree of recovery of the patient after cancer surgery. Recently, machine learning has been used to predict complex medical outcomes, such as prolonged length of hospital stay, using extensive medical information.

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Natural Language Processing

Existing bacterial culture test results for infectious diseases are written in unrefined text, resulting in many problems, including typographical errors and stop words. Effective spelling correction processes are needed to ensure the accuracy and reliability of data for the study of infectious diseases, including medical terminology extraction. If a dictionary is established, spelling algorithms using edit distance are efficient. However, in the absence of a dictionary, traditional spelling correction algorithms that utilize only edit distances have limitations.

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Health Information Exchange

The US Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) seeks to achieve interoperability with other organizations, including non-VA community and regional health information exchanges (HIEs).

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Theme Issue 2020:National NLP Clinical Challenges/Open Health Natural Language Processing 2019 Challenge Selected Papers

Patient Priorities Care (PPC) is a model of care that aligns health care recommendations with priorities of older adults who have multiple chronic conditions. Following identification of patient priorities, this information is documented in the patient’s electronic health record (EHR).

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Decision Support for Health Professionals

Cardiac dysrhythmia is currently an extremely common disease. Severe arrhythmias often cause a series of complications, including congestive heart failure, fainting or syncope, stroke, and sudden death.

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Theme Issue 2020-2021: Medical Informatics and COVID-19

COVID-19 has overwhelmed health systems worldwide. It is important to identify severe cases as early as possible, such that resources can be mobilized and treatment can be escalated.

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Electronic Health Records

Outdated gender, sex, and sexual orientation (GSSO) information practices in health care contribute to health inequities for sexual and gender minorities (SGMs). Governments, statistics agencies, and health care organizations are developing and implementing modernized practices that support health equity for SGMs. Extending our work, we conducted a rapid review of grey literature to explore information practices that support quality health care for SGMs.

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Theme Issue 2020-2021: Medical Informatics and COVID-19

Medical notes are a rich source of patient data; however, the nature of unstructured text has largely precluded the use of these data for large retrospective analyses. Transforming clinical text into structured data can enable large-scale research studies with electronic health records (EHR) data. Natural language processing (NLP) can be used for text information retrieval, reducing the need for labor-intensive chart review. Here we present an application of NLP to large-scale analysis of medical records at 2 large hospitals for patients hospitalized with COVID-19.

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ePrescribing and Innovations in Pharmacies

Innovation in technology and automation has been increasingly used to improve conventional medication management processes. In Hong Kong, the current practices of medication management in old age homes (OAHs) are time consuming, labor intensive, and error prone. To address this problem, we initiated an integrated medication management service combining information technology, automation technology, and the Internet of Things in a cluster network of OAHs.

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Tools, Programs and Algorithms

Myocardial infarction (MI; location and extent of infarction) can be determined by late enhancement cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging, which requires the injection of a potentially harmful gadolinium-based contrast agent (GBCA). Alternatively, emerging research in the area of myocardial strain has shown potential to identify MI using strain values.

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