JMIR Medical Informatics

Clinical informatics, decision support for health professionals, electronic health records, and ehealth infrastructures

Editor-in-Chief:

Christian Lovis, MD, MPH, FACMI, Division of Medical Information Sciences, University Hospitals of Geneva (HUG), University of Geneva (UNIGE), Switzerland


Impact Factor 2.96

JMIR Medical Informatics (JMI, ISSN 2291-9694; Impact Factor: 2.96) (Editor-in-chief: Christian Lovis MD MPH FACMI) is a PubMed/SCIE-indexed journal that focuses on clinical informatics, big data in health and health care, decision support for health professionals, electronic health records, ehealth infrastructures and implementation. In June 2021, the journal received an impact factor of 2.96. 

Published by JMIR Publications, JMIR Medical Informatics has a focus on applied, translational research, with a broad readership including clinicians, CIOs, engineers, industry and health informatics professionals.

JMIR Medical Informatics adheres to rigorous quality standards, involving a rapid and thorough peer-review process, professional copyediting, professional production of PDF, XHTML, and XML proofs (ready for deposit in PubMed Central/PubMed).

Recent Articles

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Theme issue 2019: Health Natural Language Processing

With the rapid growth of information technology, the necessity for processing substantial amounts of health data using advanced information technologies is increasing. A large amount of valuable data exists in natural text such as diagnosis text, discharge summaries, online health discussions, and eligibility criteria of clinical trials. Health natural language processing, as an interdisciplinary field of natural language processing and health care, plays a substantial role in a wide scope of both methodology development and applications. This editorial shares the most recent methodology innovations of health natural language processing and applications in the medical domain published in this JMIR Medical Informatics special theme issue entitled "Health Natural Language Processing: Methodology Development and Applications".

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Machine Learning

In pulse signal analysis and identification, time domain and time frequency domain analysis methods can obtain interpretable structured data and build classification models using traditional machine learning methods. Unstructured data, such as pulse signals, contain rich information about the state of the cardiovascular system, and local features of unstructured data can be extracted and classified using deep learning.

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Electronic Health Records

The widespread adoption of electronic health records (EHRs) has facilitated the secondary use of EHR data for clinical research. However, screening eligible patients from EHRs is a challenging task. The concepts in eligibility criteria are not completely matched with EHRs, especially derived concepts. The lack of high-level expression of Structured Query Language (SQL) makes it difficult and time consuming to express them. The openEHR Expression Language (EL) as a domain-specific language based on clinical information models shows promise to represent complex eligibility criteria.

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Research Infrastructures and Registries

The semantic interoperability of health care information has been a critical challenge in medical informatics and has influenced the integration, sharing, analysis, and use of medical big data. International standard organizations have developed standards, approaches, and models to improve and implement semantic interoperability. The openEHR approach—one of the standout semantic interoperability approaches—has been implemented worldwide to improve semantic interoperability based on reused archetypes.

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Reviews

Data science offers an unparalleled opportunity to identify new insights into many aspects of human life with recent advances in health care. Using data science in digital health raises significant challenges regarding data privacy, transparency, and trustworthiness. Recent regulations enforce the need for a clear legal basis for collecting, processing, and sharing data, for example, the European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation (2016) and the United Kingdom’s Data Protection Act (2018). For health care providers, legal use of the electronic health record (EHR) is permitted only in clinical care cases. Any other use of the data requires thoughtful considerations of the legal context and direct patient consent. Identifiable personal and sensitive information must be sufficiently anonymized. Raw data are commonly anonymized to be used for research purposes, with risk assessment for reidentification and utility. Although health care organizations have internal policies defined for information governance, there is a significant lack of practical tools and intuitive guidance about the use of data for research and modeling. Off-the-shelf data anonymization tools are developed frequently, but privacy-related functionalities are often incomparable with regard to use in different problem domains. In addition, tools to support measuring the risk of the anonymized data with regard to reidentification against the usefulness of the data exist, but there are question marks over their efficacy.

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Machine Learning

Myocardial injury after noncardiac surgery (MINS) is associated with increased postoperative mortality, but the relevant perioperative factors that contribute to the mortality of patients with MINS have not been fully evaluated.

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Electronic Health Records

Since the creation of the problem-oriented medical record, the building of problem lists has been the focus of many studies. To date, this issue is not well resolved, and building an appropriate contextualized problem list is still a challenge.

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Tools, Programs and Algorithms

Extraction of line-of-therapy (LOT) information from electronic health record and claims data is essential for determining longitudinal changes in systemic anticancer therapy in real-world clinical settings.

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Ontologies, Classifications, and Coding

Medical information management for stroke patients is currently a very time-consuming endeavor. There are clear guidelines and procedures to treat patients having acute stroke, but it is not known how well these established practices are reflected in patient documentation.

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Big Data

Social media has become an established platform for individuals to discuss and debate various subjects, including vaccination. With growing conversations on the web and less than desired maternal vaccination uptake rates, these conversations could provide useful insights to inform future interventions. However, owing to the volume of web-based posts, manual annotation and analysis are difficult and time consuming. Automated processes for this type of analysis, such as natural language processing, have faced challenges in extracting complex stances such as attitudes toward vaccination from large amounts of text.

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Machine Learning

Linguistic accessibility has an important impact on the reception and utilization of translated health resources among multicultural and multilingual populations. Linguistic understandability of health translation has been understudied.

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