JMIR Medical Informatics

Clinical informatics, decision support for health professionals, electronic health records, and ehealth infrastructures

Editor-in-Chief:

Christian Lovis, MD, MPH, FACMI, Division of Medical Information Sciences, University Hospitals of Geneva (HUG), University of Geneva (UNIGE), Switzerland


Impact Factor 2.58

JMIR Medical Informatics (JMI, ISSN 2291-9694; Impact Factor: 2.58) (Editor-in-chief: Christian Lovis MD MPH FACMI) is a PubMed/SCIE-indexed journal that focuses on clinical informatics, big data in health and health care, decision support for health professionals, electronic health records, ehealth infrastructures and implementation. In June 2020, the journal received an impact factor of 2.58. 

Published by JMIR Publications, JMIR Medical Informatics has a focus on applied, translational research, with a broad readership including clinicians, CIOs, engineers, industry and health informatics professionals.

JMIR Medical Informatics adheres to rigorous quality standards, involving a rapid and thorough peer-review process, professional copyediting, professional production of PDF, XHTML, and XML proofs (ready for deposit in PubMed Central/PubMed).

Recent Articles

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Theme Issue 2021: Health Natural Language Processing and Applications

Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) clinical records contain the symptoms of patients, diagnoses, and subsequent treatment of doctors. These records are important resources for research and analysis of TCM diagnosis knowledge. However, most of TCM clinical records are unstructured text. Therefore, a method to automatically extract medical entities from TCM clinical records is indispensable.

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Machine Learning

Machine learning (ML) is now widely deployed in our everyday lives. Building robust ML models requires a massive amount of data for training. Traditional ML algorithms require training data centralization, which raises privacy and data governance issues. Federated learning (FL) is an approach to overcome this issue. We focused on applying FL on vertically partitioned data, in which an individual’s record is scattered among different sites.

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Machine Learning

Care for children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) can be challenging for families and medical care systems. This is especially true in low- and- middle-income countries such as Bangladesh. To improve family–practitioner communication and developmental monitoring of children with ASD, mCARE (Mobile-Based Care for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder Using Remote Experience Sampling Method) was developed. Within this study, mCARE was used to track child milestone achievement and family sociodemographic assets to inform mCARE feasibility/scalability and family asset–informed practitioner recommendations.

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Reviews

Although big data and smart technologies allow for the development of precision medicine and predictive models in health care, there are still several challenges that need to be addressed before the full potential of these data can be realized (eg, data sharing and interoperability issues, lack of massive genomic data sets, data ownership, and security and privacy of health data). Health companies are exploring the use of blockchain, a tamperproof and distributed digital ledger, to address some of these challenges.

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eHealth Infrastructures

The Health Avatar Platform provides a mobile health environment with interconnected patient Avatars, physician apps, and intelligent agents (termed IoA3) for data privacy and participatory medicine; however, its fully decentralized architecture has come at the expense of decentralized data management and data provenance.

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Decision Support for Health Professionals

Laboratory results are of central importance for clinical decision making. The time span between availability and review of results by clinicians is crucial to patient care. Clinical decision support systems (CDSS) are computational tools that can identify critical values automatically and help decrease treatment delay.

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Electronic Health Records

The COVID-19 pandemic spread worldwide in 2020. Notably, in the countries dealing with massive casualties, clinicians have worked in new conditions characterized by a heavy workload and a high risk of being infected. The issue of clinician burnout during the pandemic has attracted considerable attention in health care research. Electronic health records (EHRs) provide health care workers with several features to meet a health system’s clinical needs.

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Viewpoints on and Experiences with Digital Technologies in Health

Despite widespread agreement that artificial intelligence (AI) offers significant benefits for individuals and society at large, there are also serious challenges to overcome with respect to its governance. Recent policymaking has focused on establishing principles for the trustworthy use of AI. Adhering to these principles is especially important for ensuring that the development and application of AI raises economic and social welfare, including among vulnerable groups and veterans.

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Machine Learning

Challenging behaviors are prevalent among individuals with autism spectrum disorder; however, research exploring the impact of challenging behaviors on treatment response is lacking.

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Theme Issue 2020-2021: Medical Informatics and COVID-19

To mitigate the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic, health care systems worldwide have implemented telemedicine technologies to respond to the growing need for health care services during these unprecedented times. In the United Arab Emirates, video and audio consultations have been implemented to deliver health services during the pandemic.

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Theme Issue 2020-2021: Medical Informatics and COVID-19

Generalized restriction of movement due to the COVID-19 pandemic, together with unprecedented pressure on the health system, has disrupted routine care for non–COVID-19 patients. Telemedicine should be vigorously promoted to reduce the risk of infections and to offer medical assistance to restricted patients.

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Decision Support for Health Professionals

Retinal vascular diseases, including diabetic macular edema (DME), neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD), myopic choroidal neovascularization (mCNV), and branch and central retinal vein occlusion (BRVO/CRVO), are considered vision-threatening eye diseases. However, accurate diagnosis depends on multimodal imaging and the expertise of retinal ophthalmologists.

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