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Currently submitted to: JMIR Medical Informatics

Date Submitted: Jul 31, 2019
Open Peer Review Period: Aug 5, 2019 - Sep 30, 2019
(currently open for review)

Perceived Level of Interest in Health Research among Those Who View Health-Related YouTube Videos: A Secondary Data Analysis from the Health Information National Trends Survey

  • Joyce Balls-Berry; 
  • Emily Valentin-Méndez; 
  • Ian Marigi; 
  • Liaa Ferede; 
  • Numra Bajwa; 
  • Melody Ouk; 
  • Felicity Enders; 
  • Alexandra Greenberg-Worisek; 

ABSTRACT

Background:

More and more, people are using internet resources, such as YouTube, as a primary source of health-related information. While evidence exists of how this behavior affects the patient-physician relationship and the clinician perspective, it is still uncertain how it affects patient engagement in research.

Objective:

The aims of this study were to (1) determine if an association exists between watching health-related YouTube videos and being interested in patient engagement in research and (2) explore if any associations exist between sociodemographic characteristics, health-related YouTube use, and interest in patient engagement in research.

Methods:

We analyzed data from the 2013 Health Information National Trends Survey (n = 3039). Our independent variable of interest was whether individuals had watched health-related videos in the las 12 months; our dependent variable of interest was whether respondents were interested in patient engagement in research. Analysis included bivariate analyses and multivariate logistic regression modeling between sociodemographic characteristics, YouTube viewing, and being interested in patient engagement in research.

Results:

Interest in patient engagement in research was significantly associated with watching a health-related video on YouTube, after adjustment for relevant covariates. Individuals who watched a health-related video on YouTube, had a 2.11-fold increased odds ratio of being interested in patient engagement in research, compared to those who did not watch health-related videos (OR = 2.11, 95% CI = 1.40, 3.18, P <.001). We did not find any statistically significant associations between being interested in patient engagement in research and gender, age, race/ethnicity, or education.

Conclusions:

YouTube has the potential to be used as a tool to increase interest in patient engagement in research. Future studies could use YouTube to evaluate its effectivity promoting participation in research of underrepresented communities.


 Citation

Please cite as:

Balls-Berry J, Valentin-Méndez E, Marigi I, Ferede L, Bajwa N, Ouk M, Enders F, Greenberg-Worisek A

Perceived Level of Interest in Health Research among Those Who View Health-Related YouTube Videos: A Secondary Data Analysis from the Health Information National Trends Survey

JMIR Preprints. 31/07/2019:15715

DOI: 10.2196/preprints.15715

URL: https://preprints.jmir.org/preprint/15715


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